Typhoon Haiyan anniversary: Stocktake of reconstruction efforts

A family grieves for about a dozen kin on All Soul's Day, a religious holiday in the Philippines for remembering the dead every Oct 31, inside a makeshift cemetery at the front lawn of a church in San Joaquin village in Palo town, Leyte province. &nb
A family grieves for about a dozen kin on All Soul's Day, a religious holiday in the Philippines for remembering the dead every Oct 31, inside a makeshift cemetery at the front lawn of a church in San Joaquin village in Palo town, Leyte province.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
A solitary cross marks a mass grave near the Holy Cross Memorial Gardens in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
A solitary cross marks a mass grave near the Holy Cross Memorial Gardens in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
A young girl remembering kin lost when Typhoon Haiyan struck central Philippines on Nov 8, 2013, killing over 6,300, mostly in Tacloban city and nearby Palo town in Leyte province.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
A young girl remembering kin lost when Typhoon Haiyan struck central Philippines on Nov 8, 2013, killing over 6,300, mostly in Tacloban city and nearby Palo town in Leyte province.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
An elderly man cleans the grave of close relatives he lost when Typhoon Haiyan struck central Philippines on Nov 8, 2013.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
An elderly man cleans the grave of close relatives he lost when Typhoon Haiyan struck central Philippines on Nov 8, 2013.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
A young girl stands at the threshold of one of the gateways of a public cemetery in Tacloban city on the even of All Soul's Day, a religious holiday in the Philippines for remembering the dead every Oct 31.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
A young girl stands at the threshold of one of the gateways of a public cemetery in Tacloban city on the even of All Soul's Day, a religious holiday in the Philippines for remembering the dead every Oct 31.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
A low cement beam marks the edge of the 40m"no-build zone" that the government has declared along coasts that wrap Tacloban city, a provincial capital in central Philippines.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
A low cement beam marks the edge of the 40m"no-build zone" that the government has declared along coasts that wrap Tacloban city, a provincial capital in central Philippines.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
A row of bunkhouses inside a temporary settlement in Caibaan village in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
A row of bunkhouses inside a temporary settlement in Caibaan village in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
People ordering at an outlet of popular fast-food chain Jollibee in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
People ordering at an outlet of popular fast-food chain Jollibee in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
People going about their business at an evacuation centre in Caibaan village in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
People going about their business at an evacuation centre in Caibaan village in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
John Paul Aler, an eight-year-old suffering from growth hormone deficiency, watches one of his sisters sleeping inside their bunkhouse at a temporary settlement in Caibaan village in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
John Paul Aler, an eight-year-old suffering from growth hormone deficiency, watches one of his sisters sleeping inside their bunkhouse at a temporary settlement in Caibaan village in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
Mr Justino Goco, 51, a bus driver, stands outside his new home at a permanent relocation site in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
Mr Justino Goco, 51, a bus driver, stands outside his new home at a permanent relocation site in Tacloban city.  -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
John Paul Lacandazo, 10, sits inside a church in San Joaquin village in Palo town, Leyte province. The boy lost his parents and two brothers when Typhoon Haiyan struck on Nov 8, 2013. -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL
John Paul Lacandazo, 10, sits inside a church in San Joaquin village in Palo town, Leyte province. The boy lost his parents and two brothers when Typhoon Haiyan struck on Nov 8, 2013. -- ST PHOTO: RAUL CAPUNPON DANCEL

Typhoon Haiyan tore through central Philippines on Nov 8, 2013, lashing densely populated islands with the strongest winds ever recorded on land and generating storm surges more than two-storeys high.

One year on, rebuilding efforts have been slow, incongruent and tentative. Here's a snapshot of the situation then and now:

What happened then?

- More than 14 million people affected;

- 6,300 people died;

- 29,000 people injured;

-More than four million people displaced;

- 1.1 million homes destroyed or severely damaged.

What's the situation now?

- More than 200,000 survivors are still living in bunkhouses and tents;

- In Tacloban city, which bore the brunt of Haiyan's fury, only 50 families out of more than 14,500 in evacuation centres have received permanent housing;

- Some 180,000 babies have been born in the past year, but only a third of hospitals torn down by Haiyan are up and running;

- Only 86 out of 729 classrooms that were planned have been built.

What's ahead?

- President Benigno Aquino has approved a 168 billion peso (S$4.8 billion), 8,000-page master plan for 171 cities and towns in 14 provinces and six regions;

- Most of the money - some 75 billion pesos - will go to resettlement;

- A township is being built on 400 hectares of government and private land in Tacloban for 14,500 families. It consists of permanent housing, schools, markets, fast-food outlets, petrol stations and other service establishments and is expected to be ready by 2017;

- But there are challenges involved, including a shortage of carpenters, masons, welders and electricians, and difficulty in transporting huge amounts of construction materials like galvanised iron sheets to Tacloban