Thailand accepts military-backed constitution, says Election Commission on 80% vote count

Student activists pledge to continue fighting Thailand's new military-backed constitution after the nation voted to accept it and despite the threat of detention for speaking against the document.
An election commission official holds a ballot paper from a ballot box while counting votes during a constitutional referendum vote at a polling station in Bangkok on Aug 7, 2016.
An election commission official holds a ballot paper from a ballot box while counting votes during a constitutional referendum vote at a polling station in Bangkok on Aug 7, 2016.PHOTO: REUTERS

BANGKOK (Reuters) - Thailand on Sunday (Aug 7) voted to accept a military-backed constitution, results based on 80 per cent of votes counted showed.

Results from the country's Election Commission show 62 percent of the country voted for the charter while 37.9 per cent rejected it.

The vote paves the way for a general election in 2017 but requires future governments to rule on the military's terms.

Critics, including the country's major political parties, have said the constitution is undemocratic.