Philippines' Duterte planning curfews on children, alcohol: Aide

Rodrigo Duterte will impose a nationwide curfew on children being on the streets late at night and is also considering banning the serving of alcohol after midnight.
Rodrigo Duterte will impose a nationwide curfew on children being on the streets late at night and is also considering banning the serving of alcohol after midnight. PHOTO: REUTERS

DAVAO (AFP) - Philippine president-elect Rodrigo Duterte will impose a nationwide curfew on children being on the streets late at night and is also considering banning the serving of alcohol after midnight, his spokesman said Tuesday (May 10).

The uncompromising mayor of the southern city of Davao floated the idea a day after securing a landslide election victory built on a pledge to wage war on crime and corruption.

"Duterte will impose a curfew on unescorted minors past 10pm," spokesman Peter Lavina told reporters in Davao.

 
 

"He might also impose a liquor and curfew ban like in Davao in public places, upon consultation and a review of laws."

As part of an all-out war on crime in Davao, Duterte has banned the sale of alcohol in public between midnight and 8am.

Pubs and bars caught violating the law risk having their business permits revoked.

Those under 18 are also banned from drinking liquor and cannot go out without adult escorts after 10pm, while vehicle speeds are set at 30-40km per hour in some city sections.

The liquor ban turned Davao's Torres Street red light district into a ghost town, eventually forcing bar owners to convert their properties into spas and restaurants.

Lavina said that as in Davao, the liquor ban did not outlaw alcohol consumption inside people's homes.

Early reviews to the proposals were mixed.

Twitter user @JewemyWovi said: "REGRET VOTING FOR HIM NOW, GUYS? HUH? HUUUUUUH?"

But @Rojunonchy posted: "I'm actually looking forward to Duterte's 1am liquor ban. Less crime, less accidents and less 'Pokpoks' I assume," using a local slang for prostitutes.

The country was under strict night-time curfews when the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos imposed martial rule in 1972-1981 to fight crime and a communist insurgency.

A bloodless "People Power" revolution ended his 20-year strongman rule in 1986.

But despite warnings by incumbent President Benigno Aquino that Duterte was a dictator in the making, he swept to a landslide victory in what analysts described as a massive protest vote against high crime and poor basic services.

On the campaign trail, Duterte did not highlight his plans for curfews, instead promising to kill tens of thousands of criminals and raise the salaries of security forces.