Meet Indonesia's first family

Indonesia's new President Joko Widodo (centre) with his wife Iriana Joko Widodo wave next to former president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono at the presidential palace in Jakarta, Oct 20, 2014. -- PHOTO: REUTERS 
Indonesia's new President Joko Widodo (centre) with his wife Iriana Joko Widodo wave next to former president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono at the presidential palace in Jakarta, Oct 20, 2014. -- PHOTO: REUTERS 

JAKARTA - President Joko Widodo is getting down to managing the world's third largest democracy after receiving a rock star's welcome at his inauguration on Monday, but his family has insisted, they want to live life as before.

"We're just letting everything flow naturally. There's nothing special about us," wife Iriana, 51, told the Jakarta Post in an interview earlier this year.

Her eldest son Gibran Rakabuming, 27, who runs a catering and wedding-planning business said: "I hope nothing changes. I just want to manage my business and daily activities as usual just like when my father served as mayor and governor."

It may not be entirely possible, as there will round-the-clock protection by the presidential security detail, and state protocol to follow. The media spotlight, which has been trained on Mr Joko, also known as Jokowi, will also intensify.

So far, Mr Joko has been able to keep his family away from media scrutiny.

Indonesians only had brief glimpses of the family on the campaign trail, and their first formal introduction to the first family on Monday morning, hours before Mr Joko's inauguration.

First Lady Iriana and Mr Joko met in college, and have been married for 28 years. They have three children - Gibran, Kahiyang Ayu, 23, and Kaesang Pangarep, 20.

Gibran studied in Singapore and Sydney, before starting his catering company, Chilli Pari, in 2010. He took a bank loan to start his business, and did not take contracts from the Solo government while his father was mayor, reports said.

"There's no point in asking me about politics since I know nothing about it," he told the Jakarta Post in an interview before the presidential election.

Daughter Kahiyang graduated from Sebelas Maret University in Solo in 2013, majoring in food technology, the Jakarta Globe said. She is to apply for the civil service in Solo, the paper said.

Kahiyang insisted on going to a community health centre in Jakarta instead of a private hospital when she cut her hand, according to one of Mr Joko's assistants. She waited in line, but was given priority when they found out who she was.

"Kahiyang felt bad about it. She said 'my father is the governor, not me'," the assistant told the Post.

Joko's youngest son, Kaesang went to ACS (International) in Singapore, and is said to be a fitness freak working hard at a six-pack. Active on social media, he ran a humorous blog which is now closed to the public.

"Everything's gone on like usual (since the presidential election). No one at school sees me differently. I hope it will remain so," he said.

The humility seems to be a family trait.

The First Lady is never seen wearing or carrying branded items. Her dresses are mostly from Tanah Abang, Southeast Asia's largest textile and clothing market in Central Jakarta.

Mr Joko's mother , 71, flew economy class to Jakarta for the inauguration from Surakarta and, with other passengers, queued for security inspection said the Post.