Indonesia's new president Jokowi unveils Cabinet line-up

Indonesia's President Joko Widodo (right) waves as he walks with vice president Yusuf Kalla after Friday prayers at the Presidential palace in Jakarta, on Oct 24, 2014. -- PHOTO: REUTERS
Indonesia's President Joko Widodo (right) waves as he walks with vice president Yusuf Kalla after Friday prayers at the Presidential palace in Jakarta, on Oct 24, 2014. -- PHOTO: REUTERS

JAKARTA (REUTERS) – Indonesia’s new president on Sunday named professional technocrats to lead the top economic ministries and implement much-needed reforms that address costly fuel subsidies, cooling investment and creaky infrastructure in Southeast Asia’s biggest economy.

President Joko Widodo named a 34-member cabinet in which 18 were seen as technocrats. The rest of the cabinet jobs went to members of the four political parties supporting him, and included the appointment of the daughter of former President Megawati Sukarnoputri to a senior position.

Widodo, who was sworn in last Monday, appointed former state-owned enterprises minister Sofyan Djalil as coordinating minister for economics and vice minister Bambang Brodjonegoro, who was promoted to head the finance ministry.

“(Djalil) is an expert of economic strategy and finance and I trust him to be the captain at the helm of economic teams,”Widodo told reporters at a news conference where he announced his cabinet.

Economists welcomed the appointments of the two and markets could find some support when they open Monday.

“They know the problems and have high integrity and track records,” said Destry Damayanti, chief economist at Bank Mandiri.

“I expect them to lead structural and fiscal reform in Indonesia to accelerate economic growth.” Baradita Katoppo, Indonesian country head of Fitch Ratings, said he had “high hopes” for the two ministers, both of whom served under Widodo’s predecessor, President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono.

Djalil and Brodjonegoro take the helm at a time when Indonesia faces strong economic headwinds. Gross domestic product grew by 5.1 per cent on an annual basis in the second quarter, the slowest pace for five years.

Indonesia’s inadequate roads, ports, electricity and other basic services, along with its corruption and daunting bureaucracy, have begun to disenchant foreign investors, who are essential for the resource-based economy to grow.

At the same time, Indonesia’s commodity-dominated exports have slumped and high interest rates are weighing on domestic consumption and investment.

One of the first decisions facing Widodo and his cabinet is whether to press ahead with politically-sensitive rises in fuel prices, needed to slash costly subsidies.

The president named the chief executive of state-owned defense firm PT Pindad, Sudirman Said, as energy and mineral resources minister, and a former head of auto-assembler PT Astra International Rini Soemarno Soewandi as state-owned enterprises minister.

Retno Marsudi, the current ambassador to the Netherlands, becomes the first woman to be Indonesia’s foreign minister.

Puan Maharani, Megawati’s daughter, was named coordinating minister for human development and culture. Megawati is the head of the Indonesian Democratic Party-Struggle, of which Widodo is a member.

The cabinet will be sworn-in and hold their first meeting on Monday.