Indonesia president appoints three acting leaders for anti-graft commission

(From right) Johan Budi, Indriyanto Seno Aji and Taufiequrahman Ruki taking their oath before President Joko Widodo (not seen) during a ceremony at the presidential palace in Jakarta on Feb 20, 2015. -- PHOTO: AFP 
(From right) Johan Budi, Indriyanto Seno Aji and Taufiequrahman Ruki taking their oath before President Joko Widodo (not seen) during a ceremony at the presidential palace in Jakarta on Feb 20, 2015. -- PHOTO: AFP 

JAKARTA - Indonesian President Joko Widodo on Friday appointed Taufiequrahman Ruki, Johan Budi Sapto Pribowo and Indriyanto Seno Aji as acting leaders of the Corruption Commission Eradication (KPK).

Taufiequrahman was named the temporary KPK chairman, with Johan and Indriyanto as acting deputy chairmen, to replace chairman Abraham Samad and Bambang Widjojanto, Jakarta Post reported on Friday, quoting tempo.co.

The latter two were identified by police as suspects in different criminal cases as part of a dispute with police that has raised concerns about the future of Indonesia's popular anti-graft agency.

Abraham Samad was named a suspect for falsifying a document from 2007, the highest-ranking official yet to be caught up in a feud between the KPK and the police force. His deputy was named as a suspect in a 2010 perjury complaint.

Taufiequrahman is a retired two-star police general, who led the KPK in 2003-2007, Jakarta Post reported. Indriyanto is a lawyer, while Johan is the deputy for the KPK's prevention unit, said the report.

They will lead the KPK together with two existing commissioners - Zulkarnaen and Adnan Pandu Praja - until December 2015 when the appointment of the KPK's new commissioners will be made.

The appointments came just days after the president dropped the nomination of Budi Gunawan as the National Police chief and replaced him with police deputy chief Badrodin Haiti.

Tension between the two rival law enforcement agencies has increased in recent weeks and sparked public outrage over what many consider a blow to anti-corruption efforts in Southeast Asia's biggest economy.

Activists have rallied in support of the agency, calling police actions a blow to the fledgling anti-graft movement in a country that consistently ranks among the most corrupt in the world, according to Transparency International