Indonesia calls for greater intelligence cooperation against terrorism at Interpol forum

Indonesian Vice President Jusuf Kalla delivers a speech during the 85th Interpol General Assembly in Nusadua, Bali, Indonesia on Nov 7, 2016.
Indonesian Vice President Jusuf Kalla delivers a speech during the 85th Interpol General Assembly in Nusadua, Bali, Indonesia on Nov 7, 2016. PHOTO: EPA

JAKARTA - Indonesian Vice-President Jusuf Kalla on Monday (Nov 7) urged top international security officials to increase intelligence sharing between nations to fight the threat of terrorism.

"Terrorism is an extraordinary crime, and countering it requires Interpol member countries to cooperate and focus on intelligence," he said. "Without same and accurate information in every member state, we will have difficulty in tapping the Interpol network nationally and globally."

Mr Kalla was speaking at the opening of the 85th International Police (Interpol) General Assembly, which runs to Thursday in Nusa Dua, Bali.

The forum, attended by Interpol president Mireille Ballestrazzi, secretary general Jürgen Stock, and some 1,360 police chiefs and other delegates from 167 Interpol member countries, is expected to discuss terrorism, cybercrime and drug and people smuggling.

Participants are also expected to discuss ways to establish a system of assessing and tackling the threat posed by returning terrorist fighters from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) in the Middle East.

National Police chief General Tito Karnavian in his speech said the global security threat is becoming increasingly complex in nature and that terrorism knows no boundaries, especially with the ease of use of the Internet.

Calling for greater mutual assistance and joint operations to combat transnational crime, he said: "We must engage with other countries, various stakeholders including government and non-government agencies.

"We should implement innovative strategies to prevent, mitigate or disrupt transnational crime," he added.

Indonesia has been hit by a spate of ISIS-inspired attacks mounted by different domestic militant groups since the start of the year, and hundreds of Indonesians have travelled to the Middle East to support or fight for ISIS since 2013.