Family of Indonesian in Hong Kong double murder case crushed by grisly death

Indonesians Sumarti Ningsih (left) and Seneng Mujiasih were killed by British banker Rurik Jutting in Hong Kong in 2014. Below: Ms Sumarti's brother Suyitno with their parents Achmad Kaliman and Suratmi. The family is hoping justice will be served.
Indonesians Sumarti Ningsih (above) and Seneng Mujiasih were killed by British banker Rurik Jutting in Hong Kong in 2014.PHOTOS: SUYITNO, SENENG MUJIASIH / FACEBOOK
Indonesians Sumarti Ningsih (left) and Seneng Mujiasih were killed by British banker Rurik Jutting in Hong Kong in 2014. Below: Ms Sumarti's brother Suyitno with their parents Achmad Kaliman and Suratmi. The family is hoping justice will be served.
Indonesians Sumarti Ningsih and Seneng Mujiasih (above) were killed by British banker Rurik Jutting in Hong Kong in 2014.PHOTOS: SUYITNO, SENENG MUJIASIH / FACEBOOK
Indonesians Sumarti Ningsih (left) and Seneng Mujiasih were killed by British banker Rurik Jutting in Hong Kong in 2014. Below: Ms Sumarti's brother Suyitno with their parents Achmad Kaliman and Suratmi. The family is hoping justice will be served.
Ms Sumarti's brother Suyitno with their parents Achmad Kaliman and Suratmi. The family is hoping justice will be served.PHOTOS: SUYITNO, SENENG MUJIASIH / FACEBOOK

The grisly details of how two young Indonesian women were tortured and later killed by British banker Rurik Jutting in Hong Kong have made headline news worldwide.

But family members of one of the victims, Ms Sumarti Ningsih, have chosen to remain in the dark about how she died.

They told The Sunday Times over the phone from their hometown in Cilacap, in Central Java, that they knew nothing about disturbing videos shown to jurors in Hong Kong last week of how Jutting had slowly murdered the 23-year-old.

"We don't wish to know how she died or see any video, it's just too painful," said Ms Sumarti's older brother Suyitno.

"Our family was crushed by her death and any details of how she died will only hurt us more."

The 27-year-old said his family was informed of Jutting's trial by Ms Sumarti's Indonesian friends, but decided not to follow the coverage of the hearing.

Even when his sister's body was flown back to Indonesia for burial in November 2014, the family members were so distraught that no one could bear to open the coffin to look at her, he recounted.

"Let me have good memories of Sumarti," said their father Achmad Kaliman, a 61-year-old farmer.

He added: "I think of her every night before I go to bed, and all I feel is pain. Whoever did this to my dear daughter is worse than a beast, I just wish to see him dead."

Ms Sumarti was held captive by Jutting for three days in a luxury apartment in Hong Kong in 2014, where he raped, tortured, and then slashed her throat with a knife.

The Sunday Times was unable to reach the family of Ms Seneng Mujiasih, 26, Jutting's other victim. They live in south-east Sulawesi.

Ms Sumarti had gone to Hong Kong in 2011 to work as a domestic helper but quit after about three years. The single mother of a young son later found work as a waitress, said her mother, Madam Suratmi.

"She told me she could earn more as a waitress than as a maid, she also said she needed to save up so her son could afford a proper education. All I told her was to be safe," said Madam Suratmi, who is 51.

"We are just poor farmers and she was our sole breadwinner.

"She regularly sent money to us, paid for her sibling's schooling, paid for her son's milk."

The boy, now six, has been told that his mother has passed away.

Madam Suratmi dismissed any suggestion that her daughter was a sex worker, saying she was "not wild" and often behaved like a child herself. "She would fight with her siblings over who got to lie on my lap first," she added. "She's a restaurant waitress, not the foul thing (the media) said she was."

With Jutting's trial expected to end only on Nov 11, Indonesia's Foreign Ministry said its consulate- general in Hong Kong is monitoring the proceedings and keeping the victims' families updated.

Ms Sumarti's family is hoping that justice will be served.

"There's never a good reason for murder. If he's proven to have killed my sister, he's a vile, merciless man who deserves death. If death is not possible, then he should be locked up forever," said Mr Suyitno.

"I'm just an uneducated kampung person, what do I know about the law? I could beat the killer, but what's the use, nothing could bring my beloved daughter back," added Madam Suratmi.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on October 30, 2016, with the headline 'Family crushed by grisly death'. Print Edition | Subscribe