Cadbury Malaysia reviews supply chain after pork DNA found in two products

The Malaysia Islamic Development Department (Jakim) will hold a special meeting with the Health Ministry, Department of Standards Malaysia and Chemistry Department on the issue of pig (porcine) DNA found in two Cadbury chocolate products. Chocol
The Malaysia Islamic Development Department (Jakim) will hold a special meeting with the Health Ministry, Department of Standards Malaysia and Chemistry Department on the issue of pig (porcine) DNA found in two Cadbury chocolate products. Chocolate maker Cadbury Malaysia is conducting a full review of its supply chain after two products tested positive for traces of pork DNA. -- PHOTO: HARIAN METRO

KUALA LUMPUR - Chocolate maker Cadbury Malaysia is conducting a full review of its supply chain after two products tested positive for traces of pork DNA.

The company had recalled Cadbury Dairy Milk Hazelnut and Cadbury Dairy Milk Roast Almond, after tests on samples showed traces of porcine DNA, The Star newspaper reported.

Singapore's Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA) said it did not import the implicated batch of Cadbury brand products.

"Nevertheless, AVA will be checking similar products under the Cadbury brand available in our market to ensure that the ingredients used in the manufacturing of the products are truly as declared under the statement of ingredients,'' AVA said.

The Star, quoting Health Ministry director-general Noor Hisham Abdullah, said the chocolates concerned were Cadbury Dairy Milk Hazelnut (batch number: 200813M01H I2; expiry on Nov 13, 2014) and Cadbury Dairy Milk Roast Almond (batch number: 221013N01R I1; expiry on Jan 15, 2015).

A test on a third sample, Cadbury Dairy Milk Chocolate, found no traces of porcine, said the report.

The Malaysian government has said it will conduct inspection of all Cadbury Malaysia's products.

Reuters reported that the traces were found during a periodic check for non-halal ingredients in food products by the Ministry of Health.

Cadbury Malaysia, like most food makers in the country where Muslims make up more than 60 per cent of the population, has all of its products certified halal to conform with Islam's dietary restrictions, one of which is a prohibition on pork.