South Korea delays measurement of electromagnetic wave near Thaad site

A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor is launched during a successful intercept test, in this undated handout photo provided by the US Department of Defense, Missile Defense Agency.
A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor is launched during a successful intercept test, in this undated handout photo provided by the US Department of Defense, Missile Defense Agency.PHOTO: REUTERS

SEOUL - South Korea has delayed the measurement of electromagnetic wave and noise near the site where the Thaad anti-missile system is deployed.

The postponement came amid rising tensions on the Korean peninsula, with North Korea threatening to launch a missile towards United States territory of Guam. This was in response to US President Donald Trump's warning to unleash "fire and fury" on the North.

Earlier on Thursday, South Korea's military warned Pyongyang that it would face a strong response if it carried through with the threat, adding that it is fully prepared for any action by North Korea, Bloomberg reported.

The US Thaad (Terminal High Altitude Area Defence) system is designed to protect South Korea against potential threats from North Korea.

South Korea's Defence Ministry had originally planned to conduct the measurement together with the Environment Ministry on Thursday (Aug 10).

Local media reported that the plan was delayed due to situations on the site.

Officials from the two ministries were supposed to fly into the site in Seongju county in North Gyeongsang province - a former golf course - by helicopter but it failed to take off due to bad weather, Xinhua reported, quoting local media.

The group decided to use helicopter so as to avoid the residents and peace activists who are protesting against the deployment of Thaad and blocking the only road leading to the site.

At the Thaad site, two mobile launchers and other Thaad elements were already installed, and four more Thaad launchers were delivered to a US military base near Seongju.

A Thaad battery is made up of six mobile launchers, 48 interceptors, AN/TPY-2 radar and the fire and control unit.

The Thaad radar is known to emit super microwave, which is detrimental to human body and environment, but the Defence Ministry's past measurement showed a very low level of electromagnetic wave being emitted from the radar, according to Xinhua.