'Smog-proofing' their Beijing home

Madam Wang Jiang and her husband Ludovic Bodin have spent US$11,500 (S$16,400) on air purifiers for their home, including a device that tracks the indoor air quality.
Madam Wang Jiang and her husband Ludovic Bodin have spent US$11,500 (S$16,400) on air purifiers for their home, including a device that tracks the indoor air quality.PHOTO: CNN VIDEO

With the winter smog becoming a seasonal event in northern China, a growing number of affluent Chinese families are spending a fortune "smog-proofing" their homes.

Madam Wang Jiang and husband Ludovic Bodin have spent around US$11,500 (S$16,400) on air purifiers to remove the harmful particles in the air.

The sum is out of reach for most families in Beijing, where the average monthly salary is US$1,414 - the highest in China, according to China Daily.

The couple have two daughters, a six-year-old and a three-month-old infant.

"It's 'very expensive'," Madam Wang told CNN.

 

"But think about the health. There is nothing to trade off," she said.

Here is a breakdown of how much her family has spent:

US$4,300 on a fresh air filtering system, which works like a ventilation device, cleaning outside air and pumping it into their home.

US$7,200 on eight air purifiers, one in each room.

US$430 in recurring charges per month to change the purifiers.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 17, 2017, with the headline ''Smog-proofing' their Beijing home'. Print Edition | Subscribe