Moon vows to scrap new N-reactor plans

An official shutting down the power supply line of the Kori-1 nuclear reactor in Busan on Sunday.
An official shutting down the power supply line of the Kori-1 nuclear reactor in Busan on Sunday.PHOTO: EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

S. Korean leader moves to end nuclear era a day after nation's first reactor is shut down

SEOUL • South Korean President Moon Jae In vowed yesterday to scrap all plans to build new nuclear reactors as he seeks to steer Asia's fourth-largest economy clear of atomic power.

Mr Moon, who swept to power with a landslide election win last month, campaigned on promises to phase out atomic energy and embrace what he says are safer and more environmentally friendly power sources, including solar and wind, as well as liquefied natural gas.

The Fukushima nuclear meltdown in Japan sparked by a powerful earthquake in March 2011 sparked widespread public concern in neighbouring South Korea over its own aged atomic plants.

"We will dump our atomic-centric power supply and open the door to the post-nuclear era," Mr Moon said, in a speech marking the decommissioning of the country's first nuclear reactor, the Kori-1, in Busan, some 300km south-east of Seoul.

It was permanently shut down at midnight on Sunday after reaching the end of its 40-year lifespan.

"I will scrap all preparations to build new reactors currently under way and will not extend the lifespan of current reactors," said Mr Moon.

RISKY

South Korea is not safe from the risk of earthquake, and a nuclear accident caused by a quake can have such a devastating impact.

SOUTH KOREAN PRESIDENT MOON JAE IN, on why he is seeking safer and more environmentally friendly power sources.

Many reactors are located dangerously close to residential areas in the densely populated nation, he added, warning of "unimaginable consequences" in case of a nuclear meltdown.

"South Korea is not safe from the risk of earthquake, and a nuclear accident caused by a quake can have such a devastating impact," he said.

South Korea currently operates 25 nuclear reactors, which generate about 30 per cent of the country's power supply. Many of them will see their lifespans expire between 2020 and 2030, with decisions on whether to extend some of their operations set to be made during Mr Moon's 2017-2022 term.

During his presidential campaign, Mr Moon vowed to try to eventually shut down all nuclear power plants across the country, although doing so will likely take decades.

Major corruption scandals involving state nuclear power agencies in recent years and a series of earthquakes last year further fanned public distrust and concerns over the safety of the plants.

Mr Moon yesterday also vowed to decommission "as soon as possible" another aged atomic plant in the south-east, whose original 30-year lifespan had been extended by another decade to 2022.

He also vowed to introduce "post-coal" policy in line with his campaign promise to abandon coal power to ease air pollution in the country, which has the highest level of small air-pollutant particles among OECD member nations. But experts say shutdown of coal power plants could dramatically hike utility cost as coal power generates about 40 per cent of the nation's entire power needs.

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, REUTERS, XINHUA

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 20, 2017, with the headline 'Moon vows to scrap new N-reactor plans'. Print Edition | Subscribe