In Brief: May defends decision on N-power deal

British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a press conference at the G20 summit in Hangzhou, China on Sept 4, 2016.
British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a press conference at the G20 summit in Hangzhou, China on Sept 4, 2016. PHOTO: AFP

May defends decision on N-power deal

British Prime Minister Theresa May yesterday defended her decision to delay a partly Chinese-funded nuclear power deal, despite it causing diplomatic tension with China.

"This is the way I operate," she told reporters on board her official plane on the way to Hangzhou for the Group of 20 summit. "I don't just come in and say, 'I'm going to take a decision' - I look at the evidence, weigh up that evidence, take the advice and consider that and come to my decision."

A final decision is expected later this month. Mrs May is reportedly concerned about the possible national security risks of allowing China to invest in nuclear projects, with the plant being seen as a gateway to a deal that would pave the way for Chinese involvement in another two nuclear plants.

REUTERS


Xi hopes for fair Australia policy

Chinese President Xi Jinping told Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull yesterday that he hopes Australia continues to provide a fair, transparent and predictable policy environment for foreign investors. China was angered after Australia last month blocked the A$10 billion (S$10.3 billion) sale of the country's biggest energy grid to Chinese bidders.

REUTERS


Putin wants to restore ties with Britain

Russian President Vladimir Putin told British Prime Minister Theresa May on the sidelines of the Group of 20 summit that he wants to restore ties between the two countries, a Kremlin spokesman said yesterday. "Mr Putin sent a clear and unequivocal signal: We are interested in the restoration of our relations, we are interested in renewal of talks in all spheres, including the most sensitive ones," Mr Dmitry Peskov told reporters.

Mrs May, for her part, recognised the existence of "some differences as well as some complex and serious issues of common concerns" between the two countries, calling for a "frank and open relationship and dialogue".

REUTERS

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 05, 2016, with the headline 'In Brief'. Print Edition | Subscribe