How Hong Kong's Chief Executive is elected

The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region sign is displayed inside the Central Government Offices building in Hong Kong, China, on Dec 9, 2016.
The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region sign is displayed inside the Central Government Offices building in Hong Kong, China, on Dec 9, 2016. PHOTO: BLOOMBERG

Hong Kong's next leader will be elected by an Election Committee made up of 1,194 members.

The committee represents four sectors - economic, professional, social and political. Under these, there are 38 sub-sectors representing various trades, professions, social services groups and district organisations.

Some of the sub-sectors elected their members by drawing lots, while others were voted in during a polling exercise on Sunday.

About 230,000 people under the various sub-sectors were eligible to cast their ballots on Sunday to fill 733 seats on the Election Committee. A record number of 107,000 registered voters cast their votes.

This term, 461 seats were returned as they were uncontested or held by ex-officio members. They also included those given a seat by virtue of their posts, such as lawmakers in the Legislative Council.

 

Six sub-sectors - legal, education, higher education, social welfare, IT and health services - saw clean sweeps by the pan-democratic camp, while business sectors such as hotels, the tourism sector and commerce continued to be dominated by pro-establishment figures and tycoons.

The hotels sub-sector elected Harilela Hotels director Gary Harilela, K. Wah Group founder Lui Che Woo, and second-generation tycoons, including Sino Land executive director Daryl Ng Win Kong, Hopewell Holdings managing director Thomas Wu, and Henderson Land Development vice-chairman Martin Lee Ka Shing.

In the financial services sub-sector, 33 candidates fought for 18 seats, and eight who supported Mr Leung Chun Ying in his bid to become Chief Executive in 2012 were re-elected.

To become a Chief Executive candidate, one must secure nominations from at least 150 committee members. And the next Chief Executive needs to secure more than 600 votes to win.

Joyce Lim

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on December 13, 2016, with the headline 'How Chief Executive is elected'. Print Edition | Subscribe