Cathay Pacific flight attendants threaten strike in August over pay

Flight attendants from Hong Kong's flag carrier airline Cathay Pacific stage a pay protest outside Cathay Pacific's management headquarters at Cathay City, Lantau Island, Hong Kong, China on May 21, 2015. The Cathay Pacific Airways flight a
Flight attendants from Hong Kong's flag carrier airline Cathay Pacific stage a pay protest outside Cathay Pacific's management headquarters at Cathay City, Lantau Island, Hong Kong, China on May 21, 2015. The Cathay Pacific Airways flight attendants' union said that it would move forward with plans for a strike in August, accusing the company's management of failing to negotiate pay and benefits. -- PHOTO: EPA

HONG KONG (REUTERS) - The Cathay Pacific Airways flight attendants' union said that it would move forward with plans for a strike in August, accusing the company's management of failing to negotiate pay and benefits.

More than 300 union supporters, some carrying placards, staged a protest outside the Cathay Pacific headquarters on Thursday.

Union representatives said they would distribute leaflets in Hong Kong's Central district apologising to passengers and asking them to re-arrange their travel plans.

"We are not asking the company to give us anything more, but to give back what we used to have. The company is not following its own policies," union vice-chairman Julian Yau Chi Hung said.

Cathay Pacific's cabin crew general manager Maggie Yeung told reporters she was confident staff would be rational and put clients first. She also said management was happy to meet with union representatives.

Mr Yau said the union may change its plans regarding the strike depending on discussions with the airline's management.

The union has not gone on strike in 22 years but is calling on its 6,400 members to be ready to stop work if the airline continues to ignore its demands. The proposed strike would run from Aug 18 to 31, during the height of the summer travel season. It would include flight staff but not pilots.

-- VIDEO: COURTESY OF SERENE WONG