EDITORIAL NOTES

Blacklisting tourists for better behaviour a step in the right direction: China Daily

Chinese tourists stand in front of an Australian naval ship as they take pictures of the Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge.
Chinese tourists stand in front of an Australian naval ship as they take pictures of the Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge. PHOTO: REUTERS

In its editorial on Dec 24, 2015, The China Daily applauds the tourism authority's latest move to punish Chinese tourists who behave badly, calling it a step in the right direction.

As part of its efforts to improve the image of Chinese tourists overseas, the National Tourism Administration recently made public the names of five tourists blacklisted for "uncivilised behaviour".

This brings the number on the list to 16.

Over the one to three years that such a record will remain, those on the list can be refused service by travel agents, airlines, hotels and scenic sites.

Given that uncivilised behaviour by domestic tourists has been frequently exposed in recent years, such a list is indeed necessary as it can help rein in wrongdoers and potentially deter other tourists from behaving badly.

The occasional uncivilised behaviour of some has stained the image of Chinese tourists as a group. Many Chinese who have travelled abroad said they felt ashamed to see notices specially written in Chinese reminding people to observe some basic social norms.

The speed with which descriptions or video clips of uncivilised behaviour have spread via social media, which usually invite widespread derision and even cause an online manhunt for the perpetrators, also indicates Chinese people's growing intolerance of "offenses" that were previously viewed as unimportant.

Although Chinese tourists are generally welcomed, well-behaved Chinese tourists are having to pay the bill for the misdeeds of a handful of their counterparts by being tarred with the same brush.

A raised awareness of "civilised behaviour" needs to be developed as more Chinese tourists travel abroad as part of their lifestyle. At home, the country's bid to transform itself into a consumption-led economy also means more efforts are needed to raise the quality of tourists as part of its efforts to boost the domestic tourism industry.

The tourism authority's latest move to punish tourists who behave badly is a positive step in this direction.