Aussie cat may be officially recognised as world's longest domestic feline

Omar was a "tiny" kitten when adopted but started growing and was 10kg at one year old.
Omar was a "tiny" kitten when adopted but started growing and was 10kg at one year old. PHOTO: INSTAGRAM/OMAR_MAINECOON
The three-year-old feline, weighing a hefty 14kg, is also too heavy for owner Stephy Hirst to regularly pick up.
The three-year-old feline, weighing a hefty 14kg, is also too heavy for owner Stephy Hirst to regularly pick up.PHOTO: INSTAGRAM/OMAR_MAINECOON

After achieving Internet fame, a 120cm Maine coon named Omar may be recognised by Guinness World Records as the world's longest domestic cat.

The three-year-old feline, weighing a hefty 14kg, is also too heavy for owner Stephy Hirst to regularly pick up.

She started an Instagram account for it just two weeks ago, and Omar's popularity exploded when the Cats of Instagram account shared one of her pictures a week ago. That photo now has almost 275,000 likes and Omar's Instagram account has close to 25,000 followers.

Ms Hirst, who lives in Melbourne, Australia, said Guinness World Records then contacted her to let her know that Omar could be the longest cat in the world.

The current record-holder is a 118cm feline that lives in England. It is also a Maine coon, a breed known for its large size.

Ms Hirst, 29, told the Maroondah Leader newspaper that Omar was a "tiny" kitten when she and her partner Rowan Lawrence adopted it, but that it "just started growing and was 10kg at one year old".

Omar has now achieved national fame, being featured in major Australian publications and on TV. However, the "placid" pet has not coped well with the media scrutiny, Ms Hirst told the BBC.

For instance, while she talked with Channel 7 presenters for their Sunrise TV programme, Omar hid under the bed.

The pet's day normally begins at 5am, when it eats dry cat food for breakfast, followed by lounging around the house, playing in the backyard, taking naps on the trampoline and munching on raw kangaroo meat for dinner, according to the BBC.

"We buy human-grade kangaroo meat at the supermarket," said Ms Hirst, adding it was the only meat they could find that Omar "actually wants to eat".

It can take up to 12 weeks for Guinness World Records to respond to evidence for record attempts. Guinness representatives in London confirmed with the BBC that "Omar and his family" have sent in an application.

However, Ms Hirst believes that her feline would prefer to return to its relaxed life before it found fame.

She told the BBC: "He's just looking forward to napping on the trampoline, chowing down on some more kangaroo and trying to keep us awake at night."